Tech-driven social innovation on the rise

PURPOSE is the new profit. Mission-driven businesses are on the uptick, as more entrepreneurs use technology to build novel, sustainable solutions to social problems. In other words, they are finding it feasible to do good and make money while at it - and they are getting help along the way in the form of seed money, networking help and tips on shaping their ventures.

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Paktor snags US$10m funding, Infocomm Investments partners Bansea to fund seed-stage startups

THE startup ecosystem scored two positives on Monday: homegrown dating platform Paktor snagged US$10 million in a new funding round, while Infocomm Investments (IIPL) has partnered Bansea (the Business Angel Network South-east Asia) to jointly invest in local seed-stage startups.

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We will soon ‘pay others to live our lives’ – and it’s not such a bad thing

Life in the future will be easier – albeit heavily machine-aided. It does not require a far stretch of the imagination for one to visualize a future where robotic vacuums, lawn mowers, pool cleaners, and robotic personal assistants support our day-to-day lives.

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Singtel ups the ante in fragmented mobile payment market

SINGTEL on Tuesday unveiled its Singtel Transit near-field communications (NFC) SIM and an improved version of its mobile payment app, Dash.

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‘Unicorn’ Garena bags US$170m in Series D funding

SINGAPORE tech "unicorn" Garena has raised US$170 million in Series D funding led by Khazanah Nasional Bhd, the strategic investment arm of the Malaysian government, taking total investment to date past US$500 million.

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‘Creative destruction’ the next step for companies to survive and thrive

BUSINESSES should sit up and take a good, hard look at the "disruption" coming to their industries - or risk becoming obsolete and having no part to play in Singapore's future economy.

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专访:新加坡创行投资有限公司Venturecraft总裁何豪杰

随着网络经济蓬勃发展,中国涌现一批国际领先网络企业,如华为、腾讯、阿里巴巴、百度等。中国网络企业在全球互联网前十强中,占据四席。

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How the start-up scene in Singapore is changing

Within a short space of time, the cash available to new start-ups in Southeast Asia has gone from virtually non-existent to abundant. And that, say analysts, reflects the potential a growing number of investors see in firms that mostly start in Singapore and expand into the much bigger Southeast Asian market.

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